Paul Wayne Dickson, 86, of Cedar Falls passed away at NewAldaya Lifescapes on Monday, October 28, 2019. He was born in Bartlett, Ohio, son of Wayne and Dorothy (Smith) Dickson.

After graduating from high school, Paul worked as a pumpman for the Illinois Central Railroad in Waterloo until 1953 when he was inducted into the United States Army, serving two years in Germany. After an honorable discharge, Paul returned to Waterloo and was married to Mary Jean DeHaven on July 12, 1958, at Zion Lutheran Church of Waterloo. He worked various jobs until settling at John Deere at the Product Engineering Center, retiring in 1987 with 32 years of service.

Paul was preceded in death by his parents; and his wife of nearly 61 years, Mary Jean.

He is survived by his son, David (Lisa Sundell) Dickson of Boulder, CO; two daughters, Lynda (Jon) Loy of Waterloo and Janet (Gary) Martinson of La Porte City; five grandchildren: Audra (Chip) Andrew of TX, Madison DeWitt of La Porte City, Hannah and Natasha Dickson of Boulder, CO, and Collin Loy of Waterloo; one great-grandchild, Carson Andrew; a brother, Edward Dickson of Waterloo; and a sister, Violet (Warren) Bown of Cedar Falls.

Services will be 10:30 am Monday, November 4, 2019, at St. John American Lutheran Church in Cedar Falls with burial at Garden of Memories in Waterloo. Visitation will be 3:30-5:00 pm on Sunday at Dahl-Van Hove-Schoof Funeral Home in Cedar Falls and one hour prior to services at the church on Monday.

Memorials may be directed to Cedar Valley Hospice or NewAldaya Lifescapes.

Online condolences may be left at www.DahlFuneralHome.com.

Paul enjoyed going on big family vacations, reading at home, and watching football or the history channel. He always believed in fixing things and one of his biggest joys was doing car repair with his son-in-law, Jon. In later years, he was very devoted to his wife, Mary Jean, traveling to music festivals, Sturgis Falls, coffee shops, or just hanging around having snacks and tending to her needs while at the nursing home. His family was very important to him.

He had a unique sense of order within his home, but was much more care free on his many travels across the country. He was at his best while on coast-to-coast family tours to various historical sites, national parks, big cities, small cities, fishing holes, and obscure camping areas. His childhood sense of adventure was always with him through his enjoyment of amusement parts, canoe trips, white water rafting, horseback riding, or attempting to downhill ski. A trip with Paul always involved a bit of the unknown whether in destination or duration – wanderlust that he passed on to all of his children.