In a world where common names for newspapers usually include Times or Tribune, La Porte City’s newspaper name stands alone. It shouldn’t be surprising to learn that the city’s founder, Dr. Jesse Wasson, played an important role in how The Progress Review came to be. Did you know that this unusual name was created by combining the names of two rival publications that merged in the late 1800s?

Whether deliberate or by accident, the choice to combine “progress” with “review,” two words that initially seem like opposites, actually serves to describe two important functions that newspapers perform. The “progress” portion, or current news, looks forward and seeks to inform area residents of the important events of the day. The “review” aspect, equally important, performs the role of community archive. Years from now, local citizens will be able, if we’ve done our job well, to learn about what the important issues and events were in La Porte City in 2018, just by perusing the pages of The Progress Review.

The earliest editions of The Progress Review date back to the 1870s and copies of those newspapers can still be read today at Hawkins Memorial Library. Thanks to the State Historical Society, whose diligent efforts archive dozens of Iowa periodicals to microfilm, the local library has a collection of The Progress Review that is considered to be a more permanent than even digital records. When stored properly, microfilm can last indefinitely and is not subject to hard drive failures that can wreak havoc with digital data. Unfortunately, state budget cuts some 15 years ago eliminated the service that had provided microfilm archives of The Progress Review to the local library, leaving a gap in its historical record of La Porte City.

Even if the library’s historical collection of The Progress Review was complete, microfilm, while permanent, is not multi-user friendly, nor is it easily searchable. A digital record, if available, could allow many people to search and access The Progress Review’s archives simultaneously, much like www.theprogressreview.co allows visitors to search and view news from the past five years. If only a website with the complete archives of the local newspaper could be constructed…

That day will soon be here, thanks to Advantage Preservation, a company that specializes in such work, along with the contributions from a variety of sources, including a recent grant from the Max and Helen Guernsey Foundation, grants from Aureon (with support from LPC Connect), a donation made in memory of George and Faye Abel, along with donations from the La Porte City Women’s Club and other individuals. Working with Hawkins Memorial Library Director Jolene Kronschnabel, The Progress Review has jump-started the local history website project with the donation of archives dating back to 2009. At an estimated cost of $10,000 to digitize and microfilm a complete, searchable record of The Progress Review, a website has been created where you can explore La Porte City’s history free of charge. While still in the early stages of development, you can begin your search by logging onto http://laportecity.advantage-preservation.com/. Links to the site can also be found on The Progress Review and Hawkins Memorial Library websites.

As you browse, you will notice there are still a number of gaps in the local historical record. To help fill in those gaps with a donation, we encourage you to contact Hawkins Memorial Library (342-3025) to see which years of LPC history are still available to sponsor. It’s an easy and surprisingly affordable way to share a portion of your community’s history with the entire World Wide Web.