Tag: 100417

“Rock Your World” on Sunday at the Quarry

In conjunction with Earth Science Week, BMC Aggregates will be hosting Sunday at the Quarry on Sunday, October 8 from 11 AM-4 PM at Morgan Quarry, 4618 E. Donald Street in Waterloo.
This  FREE event is open to the public with this year’s theme, “Everyone Lives in a Watershed.”  Participants will have the opportunity to take a fun-filled educational  trip “Into the Pit” to learn the geology of the area, collect rocks, minerals and fossils that they can take home and enjoy programs, presentations and hands-on learning provided by the following groups: 
Black Hawk County Soil and Water Conservation Watershed Program, Black Hawk Gem and Mineral Club, Dry Run Creek Watershed Improvement Project, Iowa Flood Center, Iowa Geological Survey, Iowa Learning Farms Conservation Station, Middle Cedar River Watershed Management Authority, Miller Creek Water Quality Improvement Project, State Hygienic Lab, University of Northern Iowa Earth and Environmental Science, University of Iowa Mobile Museum, US Geological Survey, City of Waterloo
All scouts, school groups, youth organizations and anyone interested in Earth Science is encourage to attend. Questions can be directed to (319) 235-6583.

Consumer Counselor – October 4, 2017

Enjoy an Eco-Friendly Autumn
Autumn arrives with cool breezes, awe-inspiring foliage and the hint of holidays on the horizon. Fall is a favorite time of year for many people because the crisp weather motivates people of all ages to enjoy the great outdoors.
Individuals conscious of their carbon footprints can use fall as a time to take inventory of their behaviors and make changes where necessary. The following are some steps to take right now that fit perfectly with the harvest season.
Shop at a local farm stand. Take advantage of the many roadside stands that crop up this time of year where you can find bushels of apples, pumpkins, gourds, and late-summer vegetables. After a day of sightseeing, visit a farm stand for warm cider and freshly baked doughnuts. Buying local produce reduces reliance on foreign-shipped foods and other products, while also cutting back on the fuel consumed to get foods from the farm to the table.
Use nature to decorate. Skip plastic, mass-produced decorations and rely on nature to dress up your home. Fill vases with leaves and berries. Place small pumpkins on mantles, and enrich the landscape of your home with vibrantly hued mums and other cool-weather plants. Corn husks and stalks can add harvest flair to front porches. Twigs nestled and tied together can make interesting table centerpieces.
Create a composting pile. Outdoor chores are easier in cool weather than they are when the mercury rises. Set aside a place in the yard for composting. A healthy compost pile should have roughly two-thirds carbon (brown) materials and one-third nitrogen (green) materials, says EarthEasy.com. Use those lawn clippings and raked leaves to make compost for spring plantings.
Visit a corn maze. After corn has been harvested, farm owners often use their land for supplemental income. Corn mazes can be simple or complex depending on visitors’ ages. Engage in family bonding outside and turn off electronics in the process.
Bake your own pie. After a fun-filled day picking apples at a nearby orchard, head home and use those locally sourced apples to whip up a delicious pie. 
Recycle old clothes to dress your scarecrow. Clothing that is not worthy of donation can be transformed into a festive scarecrow just in time for Halloween hijinks. Fill out the body of the scarecrow with newspaper and then add some pieces of straw around the neck, hands and feet.

Photos: Governor’s Lifesaving Awards

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Meditations – October 4, 2017

By Christopher Simon
Life Goes On 
“Blessed are those who mourn, for they will be comforted.”   ~ Matthew 5:4 NIV
If you have lived long enough to experience the passing away of many of your friends and family, you realize that life goes on despite their deaths. There is something in us which feels compelled to stop everything to memorialize the passing of dear loved ones, and that is as it should be.
Someone who doesn’t take time out of his or her busy schedule to go to a funeral or otherwise honor someone’s passing will probably regret it later, and may need to think about his or her priorities. And yet life must go on.
We all have lives to live and responsibilities to meet and we can’t interrupt them indefinitely because someone has died. The crux is in balancing the mourning and grief with the responsibilities. Many things will go on without us being there. Your co-workers will handle things while you go to the funeral and take time to mourn, but eventually you will need to return to work. 
Some cultures make haste with the funeral and burial rites, requiring the body to be buried within 24 hours after death. There is undoubtedly wisdom in such practices, as it allows the mourners to get back to their lives quickly, but there is no single right answer for these things. 
Situations vary, and some people need more time to grieve than others. Stop the clocks, turn off the phone, and mourn, but realize that life does indeed go on.

Union 48, Waterloo Columbus 7

Thanks to another strong defensive performance, the Union Knights had little trouble winning their fifth straight game, turning in a dominating performance at Waterloo Columbus to trounce the Sailors, 48-7.
Columbus proved to be a generous host on the first play of the game, fumbling the opening kickoff, giving the ball to the Knights on the Sailors’ 25 yard line. From there, it was just a handful of plays before Koby Alpers’s eight yard run put Union on the scoreboard for an early 7-0 lead.
The Knights controlled field position throughout the game. Late in the first period, a short Columbus punt set up the Union offense on the Sailors’ 45 yard line. The Knights made quick work of the short field, needing just five plays to double their lead after Kaleb Roach scored on a one yard plunge.
Early in the second quarter, Union’s punt coverage team gave the offense great field position, blocking a Sailor punt. One play later, Alpers was in the end zone again following a ten yard run. Union 21, Columbus 0.
The Knights’ defense then forced an errant pass from Columbus quarterback Parker Westhoff, and Union’s Quinten Kinsel was in the right place to take advantage, returning the interception ten yards to the Columbus 23 yard line. Alpers’ third touchdown run of the first half extended the Union lead to 28-0 with 6:27 remaining in the half. 
The Knights still had time to score two more first half touchdowns on a pair of Troy Hanus runs, first driving 48 yards after the defense forced another quick three and out. After trading interceptions, another short Columbus punt gave the Knights the ball on the Sailors’ 29 yard line. Union used all but seven seconds of the 1:05 remaining in the second quarter to extend the lead to 41-0 at halftime. 
Union’s final score of the game came on the first play from scrimmage in the third quarter, as Britton Rolison burst through an opening for a 61 yard touchdown run. The Union defense was the story of the game, limiting Columbus to just 85 total yards of offense, 69 of which came on a two play scoring drive late in the game as the Knights substituted freely on defense. It was the first touchdown scored against the Union defense in four games.
After feasting on teams at the bottom of the District 4 standings, Union begins a three game stretch that will determine their postseason fate. First up is a game against Waukon (5-1), a team several publications had as the preseason #1 ranked team in Class 2A. While the game will be played on the Upper Iowa University field  for the second consecutive season, the Knights will be listed as the home team.

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